Human Resources

It is vital to remember that you, as an employer, are bound by data protection obligations and often this is not recognised on application forms.  Any evidence of an employee’s right to work in the UK and any financial or criminal information is sensitive personal information and must be treated as such.  Whilst certain roles (particularly those in the caring professions and involving vulnerable adults and children, for example) may require the employer to check an applicant's criminal background, this is unlikely to be relevant for the majority of insurance brokers, since the request for information must be ‘proportionate’ to the role.

Contrary to what you may have read in the British press, the European Court of Human Rights’ (ECHR) decision in a recent case (Barbulescu v. Romania) does not give employers free rein to monitor any and all communications made at work by their employees.

Concordia Employment Services Limited the London based MGA has just launched a new product designed for insurance intermediaries: CONCORDIA BROKER PROTECT.

Aside from the continuing debate on zero hours contracts, it’s been a relatively quiet year for employment law developments, so I’ve chosen to highlight some of the most common issues that I have been asked to advise on in 2015.

Learning skills that are not necessarily vital for work may actually be a benefit to the job. A survey of more than a thousand adults, conducted by the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE), found that the UK is a nation of prospective learners. 50 per cent of the survey respondents said they would be prepared to take up a course to improve their skills in areas of interest to them, with 60 per cent of 25 to 34 year olds expressing the desire to learn new skills.

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